Education System… Like a Production Line perhaps?!

6 Feb

Whose place is it to decide what we should learn? If the economy is changing, why isn’t what and how we learn adapting??

Some people are beginning to feel that schools are putting barriers in students’ path to succeeding, instead of removing them! You may ask…  how are they doing this?

  1. Creativity à Killed (Ken Robinson)? Is it because students are pressurized to accept the circumstances, any ideas people may have of differing from the accepted norm is dismissed
  2. Independent thinking à Anymore? Replaced by dependent thinking
  3. Pressure to excel à Students are pushed and pushed, they must succeed, and failure is not an option. Does this kill a students love to learn? Learning for love and enjoyment is a beneficial life skill… should we be killing it?

 

Think of a classroom… what’s required?

An active interest from students to their instructors program. In my A-level psychology class, the book was full of topics that we could study, but because the topic choices had to be entered 9 months previous we got no say on what we learnt! Fair?! I didn’t think so!

Brophy (2008) elaborated on a presentation presented about “Developing Students’ Appreciation for what is Taught in School”. He concluded, that individuals who devise the curriculum, and the teachers, must make the students aware of the worth of the material they’re learning. When students are engaged in activities, with perhaps Vygostky’s learning by scaffolding, and the value of the material is fully explained and not passed over, and its applications are modelled, the students will then “experience its valued affordance”.

Schools currently are classroom focused, having shifted from natural learning. A quote I found from the 1900’s by Henry Ford about a production line mindset now seems applicable to the education system, “repetitive action with limited skills and no responsibility”. In my opinion, learning shouldn’t be like walking up stairs, few steps you reach the top and you walk or fall, in relation to education you master a few stages, get to the exam at the end and you pass or fail. This module I feel is like a treadmill, learning has no end, we decide when we are done learning, and press the stop button or is there even a stop button?

http://www.motivation-tools.com/youth/natural_learning.htm

http://www.motivation-tools.com/youth/self_education.html

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2 Responses to “Education System… Like a Production Line perhaps?!”

  1. sophmoss February 6, 2012 at 5:56 pm #

    Having a choice in what you learn is (I feel) very important. Why would you want to teach something to someone who doesn’t want to learn it anyway? They won’t have motivation or passion for it, and education should be enjoyable and part of a journey that is beneficial.
    Research by Shin, Haynes and Johnston, (1993), has compared a self-directed curriculum and a traditional curriculum of undergraduates who go on to primary care careers. The results showed self-directed graduates had significantly higher mean scores for knowledge of recommended blood pressures for treatment, and successful approaches to enhance compliance.
    This shows that the graduates of a self-directed curriculum are more up to date in knowledge of the management techniques.
    Perhaps it would be more productive to incorporate a self-direct curriculum into the education system, but I’m not sure how generalisable it is to different age groups. I’m finding this technique is resulting in learning much more information week by week from this module than other modules I have studied… but I think it might not have been so effective at a much younger age.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1490700/

  2. Sheri Schroader January 7, 2013 at 6:34 pm #

    sometimes it is hard to maintain normal blood pressures without taking beta blockers.`

    Please do take a peek at our favorite webpage
    http://www.melatoninfaq.com/remarkable-uses-of-melatonin-other-than-treatment-for-sleep-disorders/

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